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Posts from the ‘News’ Category

Disaster Preparedness for Faith Communities, Residential Paid Internship

New York Intern Program is a service-learning year for recent college graduates, which focuses on social justice, vocational discernment, intentional community, and spiritual growth.

This intern would live at Church of the Intercession (W 155th St) along with six other young adults also participating in the program.

The intern would serve with the Episcopal Relief & Development's US Disaster Program. That office works to inspire, connect and equip the Episcopal Church throughout the US to respond to disasters, particularly serving their vulnerable neighbors. The intern will help organize 6 regional preparedness training conferences, including recruiting participants, booking travel, assembling materials and working with venues. The intern will also have communications projects relating to their e-newsletter, and will help plan the organization's 75th anniversary commemoration.

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Turning the Tide: Remember Sandy, Revive Our City. Procession and Rally!

The action will start at 10:45am outside the lower Manhattan Staten Island Ferry Terminal, where delegations from communities hit hardest by the storm will converge. From there we'll start a procession up Broadway towards City Hall to tell Mayor Bloomberg -- and the people who want to replace him -- what kind of rebuilding we demand.

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Notes from SRL Research Salon III

Several attendees questioned how others were measuring recovery, and whether preliminary findings demonstrate that recovery has been equally distributed. Generally, attendees thought that Sandy had revealed existent inequalities such as high unemployment, lack of educational opportunity, low levels of affordable housing, and insufficient infrastructure.

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Call for Hurricane Sandy data

The Superstorm Research Lab, a mutual aid research collective in New York City, is collecting and hosting resources for those studying Hurricane Sandy and its aftermath. We invite you to submit any data you feel would benefit other researchers, Long Term Recovery Groups, policy makers, and groups engaged in rebuilding.

Available resources currently include interviews, tweets, public reports, canvassing data, volunteer group meeting minutes and transcripts, sermons conducted immediately after the storm, and more. While our current data is centered on New York City and New Jersey, we welcome all types of data, both qualitative and quantitative, for all locations.

This data resource is part of SRL’s larger mission of promoting mutual aid within research communities.

Please email mliboiron@mun.ca with data or questions.
superstormresearchlab.org

Page from The Building Resiliency Task Force report by the Urban Green Council. Available on SRL's resource page.

Page from The Building Resiliency Task Force report by the Urban Green Council. Available on SRL’s page for public reports.

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Hiring disaster studies adjunct

The Metropolitan Center of SUNY Empire State College is looking for
adjunct instructors to teach seminar-style, introductory or
intermediate classes on topics in disaster studies in the January
(Jan. 21-May 2, 2014) or later terms. Instructors will design their
own syllabi. We expect increased interest in disaster studies in the
aftermath of Sandy, but courses need not be explicitly about Sandy.

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Call for posters: Advancing Communities’ Disaster Resilience Conference

Poster Submission deadline: August 2nd, 2013

CTSI Community Engagement Key Function
Community Engagement in Research Conference: Advancing Communities’ Disaster Resilience
Conference Date:  Wednesday, September 18, 2013 The Harley Davidson Museum, 400 W. Canal St., Milwaukee, WI.

Milwaukee flood, July 22, 2010..

Milwaukee flood, July 22, 2010.

SAVE THE DATE

The Clinical & Translational Science Institute of Southeast Wisconsin Community Engagement Key Function in collaboration with Department of Emergency Medicine, University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee, and the City of Milwaukee Department of Public Health are hosting a one-day conference to expand dialogue on advancing community resilience in preparation for possible future disasters which have been common in this region and state.

This conference is tailored for academic, clinical and community researchers interested in developing a local/regional/international pathway to whole community emergency preparedness.  The success of the conference will also come from equal participation of a wide variety constituents, including government officials, public health professionals, community based organizations, small and large businesses, and volunteer groups.    By attending the conference, participants will explore the following questions;

·        What are current approaches and trends in Disaster Management practice and science?

·        What are the community and academic perspectives and experiences on major local disasters and risks which can enhance a shared awareness and align for resilience during future events?

·        How can existing community-academic partnerships reveal potential and existing community assets available for “in-place” preparedness and disaster/emergency response?

·        What are potential next steps for establishing a “whole community disaster response”?

The event will be held on Wednesday, September 18, 2013 from 8:00-4:00 pm in Milwaukee, Wisconsin at the Harley Davidson Museum, 400 W. Canal St., Milwaukee WI.  If you are interested in attending please e-mail Anne Kissack at akissack@mcw.edu and you will be placed on a mailing list to receive periodic updates on the event. In the future, online registration will be posted on the CTSI website www.ctsi.mcw.edu.

 

 

Building Resiliency Task Force Report Released!

From Urban Green:

We CAN be Ready.

Our Building Resiliency Task Force Report provides 33 actionable proposals for making New York buildings and residents safer and better prepared for the next extreme weather event.

Convened at the request of Mayor Michael Bloomberg and Speaker Christine Quinn following Superstorm Sandy, the 200-plus Task Force members led by Urban Green were charged with making recommendations to improve building resiliency and maximize preparedness for future weather emergencies.

VIEW the Summary Report
DOWNLOAD the Summary Report
VIEW the Full Report
DOWNLOAD the Full Report
ATTEND A BRTF EVENT:

June 25: Building Resiliency Revealed
July 11: Emergency Operating Procedures
July 18: Build Your Own “Bathtub”
July 23: The New World of Backup Generators
September 30: Fall Conference – Sea Change: Shifting Relationships between Sustainability and Resilience

Rebuild By Design, an International Design Competition to Rebuild Post-Sandy: July 19 Deadline

Rebuild By Design

The Institute for Public Knowledge is partnering with the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development and the President’s Hurricane Sandy Task Force to organize REBUILD BY DESIGN, a multi-stage regional design competition to promote resilience for the Sandy-affected region.  IPK will serve as Lead Partner for Stage Two, which will provide an analysis of the region through a collaborative process with local communities, regional stakeholders and international experts.

The goal of the competition is two-fold: to promote innovation by developing regionally-scalable but locally-contextual solutions that increase resilience in the region, and to implement selected proposals with both public and private funding dedicated to this effort. The competition also represents a policy innovation by setting aside HUD Community Development Block Grant Disaster Recovery (CDBG-DR) funding specifically to incentivize implementation of winning projects and proposals. Examples of design solutions are expected to range in scope and scale – from large-scale green infrastructure to small-scale residential resiliency retrofits. The competition process will also strengthen our understanding of regional interdependencies, fostering coordination and resilience both at the local level and across the US.

For more detail on the competition, including information on how to apply and an initial survey of available data sets, please follow the below links:

The Task Force issued a Request for Qualifications (see page 8 of the Rebuild By Design Brief) on Thursday, June 20, 2013. Responses must be sent to  rebuildbydesign@hud.gov no later than 5:00 pm on Friday, July 19, 2013.

Stage Two: Analysis of the region through collaborative process

August – October 2013

Process: Applicants selected to proceed to Stage Two as Design Teams will receive $100,000 USD for all their efforts in Stage Two. The selected Design Teams will participate in an intense participatory process organized by New York University’s Institute of Public Knowledge (IPK) in close collaboration with the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development (HUD) and other partners in the region. This process will include engagement with a wide-range of stakeholders (including state and local government) and experts to develop a comprehensive understanding of the region, its interdependencies, key vulnerabilities, and areas that warrant integrated design thinking and solutions. Teams will be expected to participate in the following over the three-month analysis stage:

  • Ongoing seminars around relevant themes and knowledge;
  • A series of team symposia (one every three weeks) to discuss common  needs for information/resources;
  • Several regional site visits to interact with local stakeholders, engage the public, and witness affected spaces and structures; and
  • An opening and closing conference for the analysis stage.

NOTE: Content from this facilitated analysis process, being collaborative in nature and involving a wide-range of stakeholders, will be public, meaning that it can be used by all teams and will be collected throughout the process and presented by NYU IPK through a variety of mediums.

This iterative research process will underpin the analysis conducted by each of the Design Teams in their chosen focus area, and inform each Design Team’s production of a research report and public presentation.

As part of the research and analysis stage, Design Teams must also identify at least 3-5 design opportunities resulting from their research. Design opportunities are defined as key opportunities or key projects that have the potential for maximum impact on the region’s strengths and vulnerabilities. These opportunities can be both site-specific and/or representative of a typology that is regionally replicable.

Through a collaborative process with the Design Teams, Competition Jury, and other stakeholders, each Design Team will end up with one design opportunity for development and refinement in Stage Three in collaboration with state and local communities.

By defining the design questions through the competition process, this competition will incorporate the regional scale and perspective and will reflect the insight and interests of state and local stakeholders. Design Teams will then select one design opportunity to focus on in Stage 3.

Timeline:
Mid-August, 2013 Opening Conference
August – October Ongoing Seminars and Team Symposia
August – October Six Regional Site Visits (exact sites TBD)
Late October, 2013 Closing Conference

Deliverables: Each Design Team must submit a highly-accessible digital research report that includes visual and non-visual analysis, and identification of at least 3-5 design opportunities within their focus area. Design Teams will publicly present their research at a conference in October 2013. These analyses will be compiled by NYU IPK into a public catalog of submissions and synthesis document that could be used by a wide variety of stakeholders. NOTE: At the start of Stage Two, selected Design Teams will meet with NYU IPK to identify an agreed-upon format for each of the Stage Two deliverables.

Please direct any questions to  rebuildbydesign@hud.gov.

The Brian Lehrer Show: After Sandy: The Seminar

http://www.wnyc.org/shows/bl/2013/jun/04/after-sandy-seminar/

SRL member Liz Koslov talks about the proposed government buyouts on Staten Island, where many residents want to move rather than rebuild their homes. This research is part of her ongoing work on the politics of urban managed retreat following disasters. Liz began studying Staten Island this past semester for an NYU sociology class on cities and climate change, and is joined on the Brian Lehrer Show by professor Eric Klinenberg and doctoral student Jacob Faber, who explains his work on the uneven geography of Sandy’s impact, in terms of flooding, access to public transit and problems with electricity and sewage.

Mutual Aid Professionalization Day! June 24!

Monday, June 24, 4-7pm
20 Cooper Square
5th floor conference room

As professional movers-and-shakers, we need heat shots, blazers, black shoes, CVs and bios, among other things. Yet there isn’t always a structure to make sure those needs are met. So we are throwing a mutual aid professional swap-a-thon designed to do just that.- Get your professional portrait taken (bring any props you may need)- we have professional photographers!
– Workshop your biography and CV with others with peers
– Clothing swap those dress clothes you never wear any more- bring what you don’t wear and leave with something new
– Public speaking workshop- get advice from your peers about your presentation style and ticks

This event is open to everyone in the spirit of mutual aid– come ready to help and be helped!
Invite friends, colleagues, students, collaborators, etc. This is not just for academics– professional activists, designers, etc are welcome.

Anything else we should do?
Can you bring or do something to help out?
Contact max.liboiron@nyu.edu or post on the FB invite.

Supported by Superstorm Research Lab, a mutual aid research collective at NYU.

New google group for SRL news

If you’re interested in following what we’re up to at Superstorm Research Lab, or in other news and events related to Superstorm Sandy in NYC, we’ve created a new public, open google group: https://groups.google.com/forum/#!forum/superstorm-research-lab

Anyone is welcome to join. See you online!

Superstorm Sandy: Are We Ready for the Next One? A Conference at the Graduate Center

Communications_Header_600px_SPRING_2013_PLAIN
Superstorm Sandy: Are We Ready for the Next One?
A Conference at the Graduate Center

In three dynamic panels on public health, disaster preparedness, and scientific prediction and assessment, experts from CUNY and beyond will discuss lessons learned in the aftermath of Hurricane Sandy’s devastation. Featuring environmental and climate scientists, emergency and health management specialists, and community advocates.

Wed, May 29 / 9:00 a.m. – 1:30 p.m. / Elebash Recital Hall

Participants will include:

Dr. William Solecki, Professor of Geography; Director, Institute for Sustainable Cities, Hunter College (CUNY); and Co-Chair, Mayor’s Panel on Climate Change

Dr. William J. Fritz, Professor of Geology and Interim President, College of Staten Island (CUNY)

Dr. Nicholas Freudenberg, Distinguished Professor of Urban Public Health, Hunter College (CUNY)

And many others

FREE – first come, first served.
For more information, please call (212) 817-8215.

THE GRADUATE CENTER | 365 Fifth Avenue (at 34th Street)

SRL presenting Wednesday 5/8: Occupy Sandy and Emerging Forms of Social Organization

Description

This event is part of the Institute for Public Knowledge’s Public Forum Series on Sandy, Climate Change and the Future of New York City, organized with the Marron Institute on Cities and the Urban Environment.

This Public Forum will address Occupy Sandy and Emerging Forms of Social Organization. By a number of accounts, many neighborhoods in the immediate aftermath of Hurricane Sandy experienced confusion, disorganization, and a lack of engagement by city, state, or federal government agencies or traditional civil society groups. Occupy Sandy, however, in coordination with local neighborhood organizations, proved to be nimble, effective, and fast acting to help with the distribution of supplies and cleanup, and they continue to be deeply involved as neighborhoods are making decisions about rebuilding. What worked, what didn’t, and how are the ways in which people are organizing themselves shaping their ability to have an impact on communities? How can New Yorkers organize to effectively tackle the realities of decades of rising temperatures, moving flood lines, and intensifying storms?

Nicholas Mirzoeff is a visual culture theorist and professor in the Department of Media, Culture and Communication at New York University. He is currently working with OWS and Occupy Sandy, and on a project on the visual culture of climate change in conjunction with the not-for-profit Islands First.

Michael Ralph earned his Ph.D. in the Department of Anthropology at the University of Chicago and taught briefly in the Cornell University Department of Anthropology before joining the Department of Social and Cultural Analysis at New York University. Michael is a historical anthropologist who works on crime, citizenship, and sovereignty in Senegal and the Atlantic world, more broadly, and is a member of Occupy the SEC.

Andrew Ross is Professor of Social and Cultural Analysis at NYU, and the author of many books, including, most recently, Bird on Fire: Lessons from the World’s Least Sustainable City. He is also an organizer with Strike Debt.

The Superstorm Research Lab (SRL) will be represented by Max Liboiron, a postdoctoral fellow in the Department of Media, Culture, and Communication at New York University with the Intel Science and Technology Center for Social Computing. She is currently researching theories of scale in relation to environmental action, and, with the SRL, investigating “The Storm as a State Project.”

Harvey Molotch (moderator) is Professor of Sociology and Metropolitan Studies at New York University where he conducts research on issues of city growth and urban security as well as on product design and development. He has also researched issues in news media, the sociology of art, neighborhood racial integration, and the sociology of the environment.

The aim of this series is to engage scholars across New York University to think broadly about Superstorm Sandy, climate change, and the future of our city. All events in the series are free and open to the public, and feature scholars from a variety of departments, including Environmental Studies; Urban Planning; Sociology; Photography; Media, Culture, and Communication; Interactive Telecommunications; and Metropolitan Studies. The series is building off the conversation started at an IPK public forum in December 2012.

The Institute for Public Knowledge (IPK) brings theoretically serious scholarship to bear on major public issues. Located at NYU, it nurtures collaboration among social researchers in New York and around the world. It builds bridges between university-based researchers and organizations pursuing practical action.

NYU’s Marron Institute on Cities and the Urban Environment is a new University-wide effort to advance interdisciplinary and international research and teaching on cities and the urban environment.

photo: Sam Horine 2012

For more information, and to RSVP, click here.

Report Released: Extreme Weather and Climate Change in the American Mind

The Yale Project on Climate Change Communication has released Extreme Weather and Climate Change in the American Mind. Free PDF here.

Highlights

  • A large and growing majority of Americans say “global warming is affecting weather in the United States” (74%, up 5 points since our last national survey in March 2012).
  • Asked about six recent extreme weather events in the United States, including record high summer temperatures, the Midwest drought, and the unusually warm winter and spring of 2011-12, majorities say global warming made each event “worse.”
  • Americans were most likely to connect global warming to the record high temperatures in the summer of 2012 (73%).
  • Americans increasingly say weather in the U.S. has been getting worse over the past several years (61%, up 9 percentage points since March).A majority of Americans (58%) say that heat waves have become more common in their local area over the past few decades, up 5 points since March, with especially large increases in the Northeast and Midwest (+12 and +15 points, respectively).
  • More than twice as many Midwesterners say they personally experienced an extreme heat wave (83%, up 48 points since March) or drought (81%, up 55 points) in the past year.
  • One in five Americans (20%) says they suffered harm to their health, property, and/or finances from an extreme heat wave in the past year, a 6-point increase since March. In addition, 15 percent say they suffered harm from a drought in the past year, up 4 points.

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Today: Rethinking Homeland Security for the Age of Climate Extremes

Public Forum: Rethinking Homeland Security for the Age of Climate Extremes

Wednesday, May 1, 2013 | 6:00 pm
NYU Department of Journalism
New York University
20 Cooper Square, 7th Floor
New York, NY 10003
RSVP if you plan to attend.

This event is part of the Institute for Public Knowledge’s Public Forum Series on Sandy, Climate Change and the Future of New York City, organized with the Marron Institute on Cities and the Urban Environment.

This Public Forum will address Rethinking Homeland Security for the Age of Climate Extremes. What are the gravest threats to domestic security? In the first decade of the 21st century, the forgone conclusion for much of this nation involved a military or terrorist attack, but in the wake of Hurricane Katrina and Superstorm Sandy, as well as spikes in temperatures, wildfires and other environmentally destructive events, extreme weather events are highlighting new security vulnerabilities.

Natalie Jeremijenko is Associate Professor of Visual Art at NYU’s Steinhardt School of Culture, Education, and Human Development. Jeremijenko directs the xdesign Environmental Health Clinic. Previously she was on the Visual Arts faculty at UCSD, and Faculty of Engineering at Yale. Her work was included in the 2006 Whitney Biennial of American Art (also in 1997) and the Cooper Hewit Smithsonian Design Triennial 2006-7.

Eric Klinenberg is Professor of Sociology, and Director of the Institute for Public Knowledge at New York University. He’s also editor of the journal Public Culture, and an affiliated faculty member of the Wagner School of Public Service and the Department of Media, Culture, and Communications.

Harvey Molotch is Professor of Sociology and Metropolitan Studies at New York University where he conducts research on issues of city growth and urban security as well as on product design and development. He has also researched issues in news media, the sociology of art, neighborhood racial integration, and the sociology of the environment.

The aim of this series is to engage scholars across New York University to think broadly about Superstorm Sandy, climate change, and the future of our city. All events in the series are free and open to the public, and feature scholars from a variety of departments, including Environmental Studies; Urban Planning; Sociology; Photography; Media, Culture, and Communication; Interactive Telecommunications; and Metropolitan Studies. The series is building off the conversation started at an IPK public forum in December 2012.

photo: Sam Horine 2012

Upcoming Events

follow links to RSVP

Thursday May 02, 2013, 7:00 pm – 8:30 pm
Public Forum: Carbon and the Built Environment

Monday May 06, 2013, 7:00 pm – 8:30 pm
Book Launch | Waiting for José: The Minutemen’s Pursuit of America

Tuesday May 07, 2013, 6:00 pm – 7:30 pm
Alec Ross on Government, Technology, and Democracy in a Shifting World

Wednesday May 08, 2013, 6:00 pm – 8:00 pm
Public Forum: Occupy Sandy and Emerging Forms of Social Organization

Friday May 10, 2013, 5:00 pm – 7:00 pm
Interrupting Global Cities

Monday May 13, 2013, 6:00 pm – 8:00 pm
Public Forum: Photography and Climate Change

Tuesday May 14, 2013, 7:30 pm – 9:00 pm
Public Forum: Infrastructure

Public Forum: Housing and Hurricane Sandy

Monday, Apr 22, 2013 | 5:00 pm
Institute for Public Knowledge
New York University
20 Cooper Square, 5th Floor
New York, NY 10003
RSVP if you plan to attend.

This event is part of the Institute for Public Knowledge’s Public Forum Series on Sandy, Climate Change and the Future of New York City, organized with the Marron Institute on Cities and the Urban Environment.

This Public Forum will address Housing and Hurricane Sandy. Drawing from the recent Furman Center report on “Sandy’s Effect on Housing in NYC“, Vicki Been and Ingrid Ellen will offer their perspectives on the current state of housing in the city, and engage in a conversation about possible futures. This event will be moderated by Eric Klinenberg.

Vicki Been is the Boxer Family Professor of Law at New York University School of Law and Professor of Public Policy at New York University Wagner Graduate School of Public Service, and is the Faculty Director of the Furman Center for Real Estate and Urban Policy.

Ingrid Gould Ellen is Professor of Urban Planning and Public Policy at New York University’s Wagner Graduate School of Public Service and Co-Director of the Furman Center for Real Estate and Urban Policy.

Eric Klinenberg (moderator) is Professor of Sociology, and Director of the Institute for Public Knowledge at New York University. He’s also editor of the journal Public Culture, and an affiliated faculty member of the Wagner School of Public Service and the Department of Media, Culture, and Communications.

The aim of this series is to engage scholars across New York University to think broadly about Superstorm Sandy, climate change, and the future of our city. All events in the series are free and open to the public, and feature scholars from a variety of departments, including Environmental Studies; Urban Planning; Sociology; Photography; Media, Culture, and Communication; Interactive Telecommunications; and Metropolitan Studies. The series is building off the conversation started at an IPK public forum in December 2012.

The Institute for Public Knowledge (IPK) brings theoretically serious scholarship to bear on major public issues. Located at NYU, it nurtures collaboration among social researchers in New York and around the world. It builds bridges between university-based researchers and organizations pursuing practical action.

NYU’s Marron Institute on Cities and the Urban Environment is a new University-wide effort to advance interdisciplinary and international research and teaching on cities and the urban environment.

Sandy, Climate Change and the Future of New York City

sandy-forum-spring2013

The Institute for Public Knowledge is organizing a Public Forum Series on Sandy, Climate Change and the Future of New York City with the Marron Institute on Cities and the Urban Environment. The aim of this series is to engage scholars across New York University to think broadly about Superstorm Sandy, climate change, and the future of our city. All events in the series are free and open to the public, and feature scholars from NYU departments including Environmental Studies; Urban Planning; Sociology; Photography; Media, Culture, and Communication; Interactive Telecommunications; and Metropolitan Studies. The series is building off the conversation started at an IPK public forum in December 2012.

April 22, 5PM Housing and Hurricane Sandy
Vicki Been & Ingrid Gould Ellen

April 26, 6PM Technology, Art, and Disaster
Jacques Servin & Marina Zurkow

May 1, 6PM Rethinking Homeland Security for the Age of Climate Extremes
Eric Klinenberg & Harvey Molotch

May 8, 6PM Occupy Sandy and Emerging Forms of Social Organization
Max Liboiron and Superstorm Research Lab, Nick Mirzoeff, Michael Ralph & Andrew Ross

May 13, 6PM Photography and Climate Change
Mark Bussell, Fred Ritchin & Joseph Rodriguez

May 14, 7:30PM Infrastructure
Mitchell Joachim, Constantine Kontokostan & Rae Zimmerman

The Institute for Public Knowledge (IPK) brings theoretically serious scholarship to bear on major public issues. Located at NYU, it nurtures collaboration among social researchers in New York and around the world. It builds bridges between university-based researchers and organizations pursuing practical action.

NYU’s Marron Institute on Cities and the Urban Environment is a new University-wide effort to advance interdisciplinary and international research and teaching on cities and the urban environment.

Part-time transcriber sought for SRL

Superstorm Research Lab, a group of NYU researchers investigating the impacts of Hurricane Sandy on New York City, is seeking a part-time transcriber to convert audio recordings of interviews into written transcriptions. The posting is open to all NYU students—undergraduates or graduates.

The work begins immediately, and can continue through the summer into the fall. The workload will vary week to week depending on the number of interviews conducted, but will generally be between 1 and 10 hours. The pay is $12/hr, and candidates who have work study for the spring or fall will be paid through work study.

Interviews are approximately one hour long. Most are in English, but some will be in either Spanish or Russian, so fluency in these languages is a plus. We cannot provide transcription equipment (headsets and foot pedals).

Please email your CV and cover letter to jessica.coffey@nyu.edu. In your cover letter, please address the following:

– Any previous experience you have with transcription
– Whether you are able to transcribe and translate from either Spanish or Russian
– Whether you have access to transcription equipment
– The number of hours a week you will be available to work in the spring, summer, and fall
– Whether or not you have work study in the spring or fall

Superstorm Research Lab is an award-winning group of NYU researchers. Our goal is to explore narratives about three substantive topics of contemporary concern—inequality, climate change, and urban governance—and their relationships to one another within the context of Hurricane Sandy. Our principal method is to interview stakeholders from across the city—policy actors in different state agencies, engaged business people, members of relevant NGOs and other civil society institutions, volunteer first responders, and residents of affected areas, especially in Coney Island. We are online at http://superstormresearchlab.org.

SRL @ AAG

Several members of the Superstorm Research Lab will be at the Association of American Geographers conference next week in LA. As in other years, the Hazards, Risks and Disaster Specialty group is holding a number of panels, and there are a many environmental justice panels that may be of interest to people whose work parallels SRL:

There are six papers specifically on Superstorm Sandy (not presented by SRL members):

From dangling cranes to flooded tunnels: Hurricane Sandy and the Geographies of Twitter
Friday, 4/12/2013 at 14:40 PM

Print News Patterns and Hurricane Sandy (2012)
Wednesday, 4/10/2013 at 12:40 PM

Tracking Hurricane Sandy (2012) through Newspaper Photography
Wednesday, 4/10/2013 at 12:40 PM

The Impact of Hurricane Sandy on selected south coast beaches, Jamaica, West Indies.
Saturday, 4/13/2013 at 16:00 PM

Community-based Flood Preparation and Damage Assessment – Hurricane Sandy
Wednesday, 4/10/2013 at 8:00 AM

The Influence of Climate Anomalies on the Development, Sequence and Outcome of Hurricane Sandy
4/11/2013 at 12:40 PM

SRL member presentations and panels (note some are explicitly about Superstorm Sandy and some are not). Please feel free to meet with us if you are interested in our SRL work:

Scale, Action, and the Environment: Superstorm Sandy
Max Liboiron
Wednesday, 4/10/2013, from 10:00 AM – 11:40 AM in Malibu Parlor 3118, Westin, 31st Floor

Geographies of Garbage: the State of the Art on Discard Studies.
Max Liboiron
Thursday, 4/11/2013, from 4:40 PM – 6:20 PM in Pico, The LA Hotel, Level 2
This panel is not about Superstorm Sandy in particular, but “disaster trash” will be mentioned.

Future of the Capitalist City
Daniel Aldana Cohen (“Climate Change, “post-materialism”, and the future of the capitalist city“) and Max Besbris
Thursday, 4/11/2013, from 2:40 PM – 4:20 PM in Corsican, Biltmore, Mezzanine Level
Climate change is one of the areas of research is SRL, and Daniel will examine the class contradictions of  existing urban climate politics in New York and São Paulo.

The Political Ecology of Urbanization
David Wachsmuth
Wednesday, 4/10/2013, from 10:00 AM – 11:40 AM in Pico, The LA Hotel, Level 2
This paper offers some thoughts on a research agenda for a political ecology not of the city but of urbanization.

Megaregions 1: Structures, Functions, Patterns
David Wachsmuth
Thursday, 4/11/2013, from 8:00 AM – 9:40 AM in Olvera, The LA Hotel, Level 2
David is the disscussant for this panel, and will be drawing from SRL’s current research in his discussion.

Grant: Emerging Crises Oral History Research Fund

The Oral History Association announces a grant of up to $3,000 to undertake oral history research in situations of crisis research in the United States and internationally. These funds may be applied to travel, per diem, or transcription costs for research in places and situations in which a longer application time schedule may be problematic. Such crisis situations include but are not limited to wars, natural disasters, political and or economic/ethnic repression, or other currently emerging events of crisis proportions.

Applications should be formatted in Microsoft Word and sent electronically by April 1, 2013, to: oha@gsu.edu.

While membership in the Oral History Association is not required, it will be appreciated if you choose to affiliate with OHA, thus supporting its ongoing efforts to enhance the use of oral history historical methods in academic research.

Application Guidelines

1. To apply for a grant, applicants should submit the following materials:

  • A one-page research proposal that addresses the importance and scope of the project. Applicants should explain the nature of the emerging crisis they are researching, provide details about the interviews planned, and suggest arrangements for preserving the interviews and making them accessible for future use.
  • A research budget that demonstrates how the grant funds will be spent. Typically, funds will be spent for travel, per diem, and/or transcription costs, although other reasonable expenses associated with oral history research may be considered. Equipment purchases, however, will not be allowed. A brief justification of all budget items should be included.
  • A current curriculum vitae should also be included.

2. The Emerging Crises Oral History Research Fund Committee will review applications and forward its recommendations to the Oral History Association, which will make the award(s).

3. The Committee will make its recommendations within four weeks after the application due date.

Mission Statement

Oral history research includes important projects that address current crisis situations in both the United States and internationally, including wars, natural disasters, political and economic/ethnic repression, or other current events of crisis proportions. Scholars conducting oral history research on these types of projects often begin interviewing informants within weeks or months of the crisis or even while the crisis event is unfolding. Obtaining funding for such research is generally difficult because of the extended application time schedule of most funding organizations.

The Research Fund is designed to provide a more expedient source of funding for these meaningful projects through an application process that is brief and that has a quick turnaround between the time of application and a decision on the receipt of funding.

For additional information, please contact:
Mark Cave
Chair, Emerging Crises Oral History Research Fund
Oral History Association
e-mail: markc@hnoc.org
phone: 504-598-7132

Additional Information

Source: http://www.oralhistory.org/award/emerging-crisis-research-fund/.