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Disaster Research Ethics

As Hurricane Harvey hits the United States, research will be important to understand what people need, as well as the underlying social, political, economic, infrastructural, and power dynamics at play. This is particularly important for documenting and reporting in terms of uneven distributions of harm within disasters.

Yet, research is not inherently good. After Sandy hit New York City, we saw disaster researchers parachute into hard hit communities, take data, and leave. We saw researchers interview survivors and report survivor insights as their own findings. This is called research theft, and it is usually done by well-intentioned researchers. It is crucial that research ethics in disasters far exceed the usual research ethics set out by universities and other research institutions.

With community input, the following Memorandum of Understanding was designed after Sandy to be a resource for a mutually beneficial researcher-community or academic-activist partnerships. It covers a number of different types of collaborations and partnerships, as well as various issues that might need discussion.

You can download the Template of Memorandum of Understanding for Mutual Aid Research in Disasters here. 

Also see the stable url on our webpage here. 

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CFP: Discourse, Disaster, and the Urban Hazardscape

Call for Papers for the 2015 Association of American Geographers Annual Meeting. Chicago, IL. April 21-25, 2015

 Session Title: “Discourse, Disaster, and the Urban Hazardscape”

Session Organizers: Erin C. Bergren (UC Berkeley), Esther G. Kim (UC Berkeley)

Format: Paper presentations, followed by a facilitated discussion between presenters and audience

Description:

Our session begins with the understanding that disasters are catalytic processes which emerge from existing social relations and also have the power to trigger further change in socio-ecological systems (Watts 1983; Pelling and Dill 2010). This CFP seeks to engage in conversation with other scholars who apply the concepts of hazardscape and discourse as critical tools for better understanding these processes and relations behind environmental disasters.

The recent literature on environmental risks and vulnerabilities examines the dimensions of the produced hazardscape. As described by Cutter, Mitchell, and Scott, a hazardscape is a “mosaic of risks and hazards that affect people and the places they inhabit” (2000, p. 715). Mustafa takes an overtly political approach and refers to hazardscape as a “way of seeing that asserts power and as a socio-environmental space where the gaze of power is contested and struggled against to produce the lived reality of hazardous places” (2005, p. 566). Khan, Crozier, and Kennedy (2012) then extend hazardscape into the cognitive or behavioral sphere, adding locally-mediated perceptions of hazard and susceptibility to the physical and political dimensions noted above. The concept of hazardscape, then, emerges as a valuable tool for analyzing how disasters are produced by local hazard systems and the social-ecological relations of power and difference which modulate these systems.

Disasters, of course, are produced discursively as well as materially, and this session is also concerned with utilizing discourse as a critical theoretical tool. Described by Hajer as “a specific ensemble of ideas, concepts, and categorizations that are produced, reproduced, and transformed in a particular set of practices and through which meaning is given to physical and social realities” (1995, p. 44), discourse provides another analytic lens with which to unpack the construction of disaster. As the sociopolitical elements of hazardscapes illustrate, disasters are powerfully shaped by the ideas and meanings behind risk, hazards, and human/nature relationships (Bankoff 2001; Wisner et al 2004; Steinberg 2000). By explicitly utilizing discourse as a theoretical tool, we wish to investigate how discursive constructions of disaster intersect with the ways that hazardscapes are (re)produced, experienced, and resisted. At a more essential level, this session asks how discourse contributes to the construction of disasters, the reconfiguration of the urban hazardscape, and the different lived, embodied experiences of such a hazardscape.

Although hazardscapes can be found in every part of the world, we seek to examine the politics and production of hazardous landscapes within an urban context. As more and more of the global population come to reside in urban environments and as cities materialize from unique configurations of social and ecological factors, the ways in which discourse and hazardscapes converge to produce and/or respond to disasters is an important field of scholarly inquiry.

Papers can explore, but are not limited to, the following topics:

●     Uneven distributions of urban environmental hazards.

●     Opportunities for discursive contestation originating in disastrous situations.

●     Hegemonic and counter-hegemonic discourses of hazards, risk, and vulnerabilities.

●     How urban natures are framed in the discourse of disaster.

●     The different perceptions and experiences of disaster in urban, suburban, peri-urban contexts.

●     The impact of climate change to the construction and experience of hazards.

●     Case studies of disaster and hazards in Global South contexts.

●    Approaches in critical geography, political ecology, environmental justice.

Please submit abstracts to erinbergren@berkeley.edu and egkim@berkeley.edu  by Friday, October 31. We will get back to you by Monday, November 3.  

 

References

Bankoff, G. (2001). Rendering the world unsafe:‘ vulnerability ’as western discourse. Disasters, 25(1), 19-35.

Cutter, S. L., Mitchell, J. T., & Scott, M. S. (2000). Revealing the vulnerability of people and places: a case study of Georgetown County, South Carolina. Annals of the Association of American Geographers, 90(4), 713-731

Khan, S., Crozier, M. J., & Kennedy, D. (2012). Influences of place characteristics on hazards, perception and response: a case study of the hazardscape of the Wellington Region, New Zealand. Natural Hazards, 62(2), 501-529

Mustafa, D. (2005). The Production of an Urban Hazardscape in Pakistan: Modernity, Vulnerability, and the Range of Choice. Annals of the Association of American Geographers, 95(3), 566-586

Pelling, M., & Dill, K. (2010). Disaster politics: tipping points for change in the adaptation of sociopolitical regimes. Progress in Human Geography, 34(1), 21-37

Steinberg, T. (2000). Acts of God: The Unnatural History of Natural Disaster in America. New York: Oxford University Press.

Watts, M. (1983). On the poverty of theory: natural hazards research in context. In K. Hewitt (Ed.), Interpretations of Calamity (pp. 231-262). Boston: Allen and Unwin

Wisner, B., Blaikie, P., Cannon, T., & Davis, I. (2004). At Risk: natural hazards, people’s vulnerability, and disasters (Second ed.). London: Routledge.

Hazards and Disasters Fellowship Program for Junior Faculty

This NSF funded Enabling Program is an education and training effort aimed at developing junior faculty to become active scholars in both their individual disciplines and in the broader hazards and disasters research community.

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Occupy Sandy affiliation survey

We are researching how people's affiliations with OWS, Occupy Sandy, and other CBOs and activist groups change over time. The project is meant to show that a metric of success for social movements is how people continue to work in activist/community settings, even after the "end" of public protest. We are looking for people affiliated with Occupy Sandy or OWS to fill out a short, 10 minute survey.

Read more

New report on the roles of activists and community-based organizations after disasters.

The North Star Fund has released, "From the Edge of Disaster: How Activists and Insiders Can Use the Lessons of Hurricane Sandy to Make the City Safer," a research and recommendation report drawing on 30 interviews with community-based organizations (CBOs) and participation in dozens of meetings and conferences across the city over the past two years.

Read more

Public Bibliography on Occupy Sandy

We've created a public bibliography on Occupy Sandy that includes a mix of academic literature, journalism, websites, graphics, documentaries, presentations, and even some internal documents from Occupy Sandy.

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The temporality of disaster

Rather than a teleological climb back to normalcy, there are two ways that many on-the-ground experiences of Sandy create a different temporal pattern. First, people who were relatively resilient and able to deal with adversity before the storm are now vulnerable. Secondly, for populations that were already vulnerable due to poverty, lack of access to health care and education, and precarious employment or housing, not only are they in increasingly dire situations, but a return to "predisaster" normalcy can hardly be called a recovery.

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Interview with Carlos Menchaca, liaison to Speaker Christine Quinn

"It took two weeks for full earnest visibility from the government. The trailers started showing up and you saw FEMA in a larger way. They trickled in for sure but their ambitions and their plug into the community was not where I expected them to be. And their nimbleness is clearly not at all possible. So I would say in two weeks we finally saw some support where the first two weeks we were really battling it out as a team of volunteers. And some of the liaisons through the government were really real major government institutional support. What you also saw were people coming out of the woodwork with things that were very important. Like somebody in the community owned a warehouse near the neighborhood, instantly everyone got that information and sent everything that was coming in to that warehouse. So that became a warehouse station, the distribution spots, the churches started coming online as distribution sites happily. And so those things were all in place with volunteers and private help which is a great feeling but it wasn’t a great feeling when two weeks later the ambulances finally show up to the public housing. And we had already created a popup medical clinic in one of our locations that were servicing 200 plus home bound senior citizens and non senior citizens but mostly senior citizens. And we were doing this all within our own means."

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Call for Hurricane Sandy data

The Superstorm Research Lab, a mutual aid research collective in New York City, is collecting and hosting resources for those studying Hurricane Sandy and its aftermath. We invite you to submit any data you feel would benefit other researchers, Long Term Recovery Groups, policy makers, and groups engaged in rebuilding.

Available resources currently include interviews, tweets, public reports, canvassing data, volunteer group meeting minutes and transcripts, sermons conducted immediately after the storm, and more. While our current data is centered on New York City and New Jersey, we welcome all types of data, both qualitative and quantitative, for all locations.

This data resource is part of SRL’s larger mission of promoting mutual aid within research communities.

Please email mliboiron@mun.ca with data or questions.
superstormresearchlab.org

Page from The Building Resiliency Task Force report by the Urban Green Council. Available on SRL's resource page.

Page from The Building Resiliency Task Force report by the Urban Green Council. Available on SRL’s page for public reports.

Interview with Josh Bisker, Time’s Up and NYU Office of Government and Community Affairs

"Spaces where it was free reign, where the community could organize what it needed, as it needed, seem to create the opportunity for resiliency and health. Here with the Church of St. Luke and St. Matthew, there with churches -- mostly churches and like a couple of businesses. I've never thought so well of churches. ... The thing that the churches gave to us was space to organize and assess our needs and then deliver upon them. And there are no other spaces like that, no other spaces like that."

Read more

NYU Law Alt Spring Break on workers’ rights issues in Sandy-affected areas

Spring Break is almost here! Are you looking for a way to promote rights and make a difference over Spring Break without leaving NYC? Volunteer with NYU Law’s Global Justice Clinic! The Global Justice Clinic is seeking volunteers, preferably Spanish speakers, to assist in a study on rights violations of construction workers in Sandy-affected areas of NYC. The project examines the experiences of construction workers on issues of job security, safety, fair pay, discrimination and access to adequate housing and healthcare, in order to collect valuable data to support the advocacy work of local community organizations in the fields of labor and immigrant rights.

Over Spring Break, volunteers will receive 2 days of training (March 17–18) in conducting interviews with participants. Then they will travel in pairs to Sandy-affected areas in NYC to survey construction workers on-site for 2–3 days (between March 19–23). Each interview will take approximately 30 minutes and survey teams will record answers on PDAs. The data will be analyzed by us and our collaborators and we will share our findings with you so you can see what your volunteer efforts helped produce.

For more information or to express your interest, please contact: Anji Manivannan (am4800@nyu.edu) or Julia Freidgeim (jf2544@nyu.edu).


Julia Freidgeim

LLM Candidate, 2013
New York University School of Law

Superstorm Research Lab presenting at Nature, Ecology and Society Colloquium 3-8-13

srl-logo-print.jpg

will present:
“The Potential for Spatial and Temporal Restructuring of Action After Sandy”
at
CUNY’s Twelfth Annual Nature, Ecology and Society Colloquium:
SuperStorm Sandy: Before, During & After
March 8th, 2013
Martin E. Segal Theater, CUNY  Graduate Cener
365 5th Ave  New York, NY 10016

About the presentation:

One of the major dilemmas facing contemporary urban governance and environmental action in the United States is the mismatch between inherited political boundaries and emerging sociospatial urban realities. This project investigates what impact an event such as Sandy can have on such structures. The common assumption is that a heroic policy, NGO, or popular effort will be needed to transform inherited structures to overcome these mismatches. This project instead investigates what impact an event can have on such structures. In Sewell’s (2005) terms, events are the fateful collective contingencies that interrupt the reproduction of structures. In the literature on crises and disasters, this is a familiar way to understand the unexpected and transformative impact such events can have on “business as usual”, and this project applies these insights to the impact of Hurricane Sandy on the structure of urban politics in the New York City area.

This paper is based on preliminary research with the Superstorm Research Lab collective. Based on interviews with policy actors, NGOs, first responders, and residents of affected areas, we ask how Sandy has potentially restructured patterns of governance and action based on stakeholder understandings of critical processes following Sandy.

About the Colloquium:

Hurricane Sandy had drastic impacts on 29 October, 2012. This year’s Nature Ecology Society Colloquium is intended to open up a conversation around Hurricane Sandy. We recognize that politics play a part in this conversation, that there are complex social and environment justice issues that have and need to be understood, and that there must be a rebuilding effort that is sensitive to all of these aspects. We hope this colloquium can be a space where presenters will openly interrogate these and other issues.

The Nature, Ecology and Society Network is the City University of New York’s (CUNY) Interdisciplinary Network for researchers, activists and other colleagues whose work is at the intersection of Nature Ecology and Society.

Full schedule is here.

Register here. 

Investing in Disaster Preparedness, Response and Recovery

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THURSDAY, MARCH 7, 2013
Panel discussion + social hour 6:30-9:30pm

32BJ SEIU – 25 West 18th Street, 5th Floor Conference Room
(between 5th & 6th Aves) New York, NY

Co-sponsors: 32BJ SEIU, DC37/AFSCME, Public Services International, The Worker Institute at Cornell

Trade unionists, community leaders and United Nations agency and national delegation representatives are invited to a special meeting to network and discuss critical disaster preparedness, response and recovery issues. In the wake of Superstorm Sandy, this is an opportunity to share experiences, lessons learned and best practice proposals for solutions.

With speakers from: 
32BJ SEIU
District Council 37/AFSCME, Henry Garrido
Public Services International, Rosa Pavanelli
TWU Local 100
UWUA Local 1-2, John Duffy
ALIGN, Matt Ryan

Your views are important. We look forward to having you join in the discussion on how we can strengthen professional expertise, public services and community capacity for better disaster resilience.

Please RSVP to Mark Langevin:  Mark.Langevin@world-psi.org
Jon Forster: 4unionnow@gmail.com

 

This is not an SRL event.

SRL at Nature, Ecology and Society Colloquium March 8th

Superstorm Research Lab will be presenting some of our preliminary findings at CUNY’s Nature, Ecology and Society Colloquium.

Screen-Shot-2013-02-09-at-12.54.06-PM

Our presentation will be on:

The Potential for Spatial and Temporal Restructuring of Action After Sandy

One of the major dilemmas facing contemporary urban governance and environmental action in the United States is the mismatch between inherited political boundaries and emerging sociospatial urban realities. This project investigates what impact an event such as Sandy can have on such structures.

This paper is based on preliminary research with the Superstorm Research Lab collective. Based on interviews with policy actors, NGOs, first responders, and residents of affected areas, we ask how Sandy has potentially restructured patterns of governance and action based on stakeholder understandings of critical processes following Sandy such as contamination, climate change, debt, and governance.

Schedule and other details to follow.

NYC’s Post-Sandy Recovery: How’re We Doin’?

AIA New York Center for Architecture
AIA CES: 1.5 LUs | 1.5 HSW || LACES: 1.5 NYS LA CEUs | 1.5 HSW
When: 6:00 PM – 8:00 PM WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 13
Where: Center for Architecture
536 LaGuardia Place
New York, NY 10012
phone: 212.683.0023
fax: 212.696.5022
info@aiany.org

Three months after the ravages of Superstorm Sandy, this program brings together government and civic leaders to both report on the status of the recovery of the New York City region and to discuss the effectiveness of the recovery efforts. The session will provide an opportunity to evaluate housing, neighborhood and open space clean-up and rebuilding initiatives.

Last October 21st, AIANY’s Design for Risk and Recovery Committee fielded a similarly-constituted panel at the Center for Architecture to address the question: “After Disaster: How Does New York Plan to Recover?” Only eight days later, Hurricane Sandy delivered a natural disaster that has given New York an unprecedented challenge to the disaster-recovery systems that were described. How well do you think they worked? What now?

DfRR has become the center of the Chapter’s focus on disaster awareness and preparedness. It is a full-spectrum committee comprised of architects, planners, landscape architects, engineers, and related professionals – a source for information, discussion, connections, and the most advanced thinking on risk, mitigation, and resilience.

Welcome:
Lance Jay Brown, FAIA, DPACSA
Illya Azaroff, RA, AIA

Co-Chairs, AIANY Design for Risk and Reconstruction Committee

Moderator:
Denisha Williams, RLA, LEED AP
Immediate Past President, New York Chapter of the American Society of Landscape Architects

Speakers:
Erica Keberle
Deputy Director of the Mayor’s Office of City Legislative Affairs
NYC Rapid Repairs, External Affairs

Bram Gunther
Chief, Forestry & Horticulture and Natural Resources Group
New York City Department of Parks and Recreation

Thaddeus Pawlowski
Associate Urban Designer, Office of the Chief Urban Designer
New York City Department of City Planning

Anthony C. Romeo, AIA
Parks Program Director
New York City Department of Design and Construction

Dean Sakamoto, FAIA, LEED AP
Urban Resilience Lab
University of Hawaii at Manoa
Ronald Schiffman, FAICP, Hon. AIA
Professor, Pratt Graduate Center for Planning
Pratt Center for Community Development

Cost:
Free for AIA and ASLA members and students
$10 for Non Members

Particpants will have the opportunity to make contributions to the Mayor’s Fund to Advance New York City to support Superstorm Sandy relief efforts.The Mayor’s Fund retains no administrative fee, and one hundred percent of donations are being dispersed to relief efforts and organizations. Funds will support immediate aid needs – including, food, water and hygiene supplies – as well as long-term relief and restoration.

Organized by: AIA Design for Risk and Reconstruction Committee (DfRR) and the American Society of Landscape Architects New York Chapter

Sandy Victims Protest BRC Headquarters

Friday Feb. 15 at 3:30 PM
131 W 25th St btw 6th & 7th Aves.
 
Transit:  #1, 2, 3 train to 23 St (at 7th Av); F, M, PATH to 23 St. (at 6th); N, R to 23 St. (at Broadway); #4, 5, 6 to 23 St. (at Park Av. So.); buses via 6th or 7th Av.; M23 cross town bus via 23rd St. <http://goo.gl/maps/rnIf3>
347 265 5003646 265 5003  eisaacs66@gmail.com
The newest hardship Sandy victims in Manhattan hotels are facing is eviction into homeless shelters. The agency that the city contracted to case manage victims is BRC, the group that usually picks up chronically homeless people from the streets and puts them in shelters. They have actually offered no help to Sandy survivors — they probably don’t even know anything about low income stable housing. They have been treating people extremely rudely and threateningly.

Now they are systematically telling people they have to leave their hotel (before their previously given check out dates) and go to shelters, one by one. No one knows for sure if they are initiating this tactic, or if it is the hotels or the city. So far 3 families have been removed.

This leaves the families in yet another borough where their children have to change schools again, where they are treated like prisoners, and where the environment is often unsafe. Others are planning to resist removal. A campaign to notify politicians and the press is underway, although that is probably useless given their previous unresponsivenes.

Victims and supporters are holding a demonstration Friday at BRC headquarters at 3:30 PM

For more info call Errol a 347 2655003 or Ellen 646 2655003
(This is not a SRL event)

Is Sandy the New “Normal”?

A TALK WITH CHRIS WILLIAMS ABOUT THE ROOTS OF CLIMATE CHANGE AND THE FIGHT FOR CLIMATE JUSTICE
https://www.facebook.com/events/162870190527163/
Thursday 8pm-10pm
Hamilton Rm: 703, Columbia University
From Hurricane Sandy to the devastating effects of fracking, the exploitation of our environment is driving outcomes like climate change and increasing numbers of “natural” disasters. Join us in a discussion with Chris Williams, author of the highly acclaimed book “Ecology and Socialism” about the man-made factors contributing to these unsustainable changes and how activists can organize for a different kind of society that prioritizes the sustainability of our environment.

Superstorm Sandy: Before, During and After

The 12th Annual Nature Ecology Society Colloquium (opencuny.org/nature) at the CUNY Graduate Center
Hosted by the Environmental Psychology PhD Program
Colloquium Date: March 8, 2013                                                                                           Deadline for Proposals: February 8, 2013                                                                             

Hurricane Sandy had drastic impacts on 29 October, 2012. This year’s Nature Ecology Society Colloquium is intended to open up a conversation around Hurricane Sandy. We recognize that politics play a part in this conversation, that there are complex social and environment justice issues that have and need to be understood, and that there must be a rebuilding effort that is sensitive to all of these aspects. We hope this colloquium can be a space where presenters will openly interrogate these and other issues.

The Nature, Ecology and Society Network is the City University of New York’s (CUNY) Interdisciplinary Network for researchers, activists and other colleagues whose work is at the intersection of Nature Ecology and Society. We aim to continue the tradition of creating a space for interdisciplinary conversation at NES2013 by requesting proposals from CUNY and allied Students, Artists, Activists, Designers, Journalists, Musicians, Performers, Film and Video Makers, Humanities Scholars, and Life, Natural, Physical and Social Scientists.

Presentation Submission Guidelines

NES 2013 invites proposals for two kinds of presentations: Oral Presentations (15 minutes followed by 5 minutes for questions) describing scholarly, activist, or volunteer work relating to Hurricane Sandy, and Panel Presentations (45 minutes followed by 15 minutes for questions) of three or more presenters addressing Hurricane Sandy related issues from multiple perspectives and/or methodologies.

Oral Presentation Proposals: Please include your name, project title, affiliation(s), and an abstract (100 words) outlining the presentation.

Panel Presentation Proposals: Please include the names of all panel presenters and their affiliations, a panel title, individual presentation titles, an abstract from each presenter (100 words), and a rationale (100 words) for the panel discussion. Please also choose a panelist to serve as the contact person and please provide their contact information.

All proposals should be submitted to the NES 2013 RFP online form. Following the selection process, applicants will be notified by February 14th. Due to time and space constraints, we may not be able to schedule every submission. Please contact natureecologyandsociety@gmail.com with questions. 

Thank you!
Colloquium Co‐Organizers
Bryce DuBois, PhD Student in Environmental Psychology
Scott Fisher, PhD Student in Environmental Psychology
Laurie Hurson, PhD Student in Environmental Psychology
Hannah Jaicks, PhD Student in Environmental Psychology
Bijan Kimiagar, PhD Student in Environmental Psychology
Do Lee, PhD Student in Environmental Psychology
Mariya Marinova, PhD Student in Environmental Psychology
Jennifer Pipitone, PhD Student in Environmental Psychology
Melissa Zavala, PhD Student in Anthropology

Faculty Advisor
David Chapin, M. Arch: Environmental Psychology

The Graduate Center, CUNY, 365 Fifth Avenue, New York, NY 10016 USA

NYCHA and the Hurricane: Public housing learns from Sandy… What’s the plan for the next big storm?

When: Tuesday, February 12, 2013 8:30 AM – 10:00 AM
Where: Theresa Land Communtiy and Student Center,  55 West 13TH Street, 2ND Floor

The wrenching experience of thousands of New York’s public housing residents following Hurricane Sandy revealed vulnerabilities of physical structures and human services. Volunteers, tenant associations, social service providers and NYCHA technicians all stepped in to do what they could through the worst of the aftermath. What did we learn? What about next time? What will a carefully planned and managed disaster response look like in New York City’s low-lying, low-income neighborhoods?

A conversation with:
John Rhea, chairman, New York City Housing Authority (NYHCA)
Wally Bazemore, Red Hook community organizer
Jennifer Jones Austin, executive director, Federation of Protestant Welfare Agencies
Eric Klinenberg, New Yorker writer and professor of sociology and metropolitan studies, NYU
Constantine Kontokosta, founding director, NYU Center for the Sustainable Built Environment

Moderated by:
Andrew White, director, Center for New York City Affairs at The New School

Admission is free but you must reserve a seat: RSVP

People’s Recovery Summit: Feb 1-3

Screen shot 2013-01-30 at 7.12.18 AMA free 3-day gathering of workshops, panels, concerts and performances to unite for a more equitable and sustainable rebuilding in Sandy’s wake.

When: Feb 1-3
Where: Church of St. Luke & St. Matthew, Brooklyn

The format revolves around workshops moving towards creating a collaborative Sandy policy statement from the grassroots. Most of the groups or individuals invited as “speakers”are actually facilitating workshops or trainings, centered on the 5 themes, focused on drafting a policy report by the end of the Summit that would be edited afterwards and released. It was the organizers’ intent to insist on horizontal facilitation of each meeting. The panel discussions previously  scheduled will be restructured into a more horizontal format. There are 7 panel discussions planned to date: “People Powered Relief, Mutual Aid and the State”, “Occupy Sandy: A report-back”, housing panel, education panel, environmental health and wellness, labor panel and an allied organizations panel. There are 24 workshops/groups planned; 7 slots for speakers; 10 resource circles; and 12 training sessions.

For more information or to register, see http://summit.peoplesrecovery.org/ and register here.

Current Sponsors:

350.org
Bailey’s Cafe
Church of St. Luke and St. Matthew
Coalition for Public Education
Episcopal Diocese of Long Island
NY Committee for Occupational Safety & Health
NYC Parents Union
Occupy Sandy
Occupy Faith
Occupy The Hood
Our Schools NYC
Paul Robeson Freedom School
People for Jelani
The Peoples Network
US Uncut
Workers Justice Project